Research Notes

user warning: Table 'wasup_1742.image' doesn't exist query: image_load SELECT i.image_size, f.filepath FROM image i INNER JOIN files f ON i.fid = f.fid WHERE i.nid = 21235 in /usr/local/projects/drupal/drupal-5.10/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.

Diversity and the Environment: Myth-Making and the Status of Minorities in the Field



This article traces the evolution of diversity research in the environmental field. It then analyzes the status of minority students in academic environmental programs as well as minority environmental professionals in the environmental workforce. It examines the questions: are minorities concerned about the environment? Are they interested in jobs in environmental organizations? Are their salary expectations too high? And, are they qualified for jobs in the environmental field? Findings show that minority students are interested in embarking on careers in the environmental fields and they want jobs in the environmental sector. The study also shows that minority environmental professionals have been successful at building long-term careers in the environmental sector.

Source: Dorceta E. Taylor. 2008. “Diversity and the Environment: Myth-Making and the Status of Minorities in the Field,” Research in Social Problems and Public Policy. Vol. 15: 89-148. http://info.emeraldinsight.com/products/books/series.htm?id=0196-1152

Diversity and Equity in Environmental Organizations: The Salience of These Factors to Students


Diversity in environmental institutions is of increasing concern to scholars and practitioners. The author examined student perceptions of the importance of 20 diversity and equity factors in their decisions to accept a job. A national sample of 1,239 students in nine environmental disciplines (biological sciences, geosciences, natural resources, agricultural sciences, forestry, geography, environmental science, environmental engineering, and social sciences) participated in the study. Although most respondents assigned some importance to diversity and equity factors, large ethnic and gender differences existed in the significance that respondents assigned to each factor. Ethnic differences in assessing the importance of the diversity and equity factors also occurred in the extent to which respondents distinguished between factors that did or did not mention subgroups of workers.

Source: Dorceta E. Taylor. 2007. “Diversity and Equity in Environmental Organizations: The Salience of These Factors to Students.” Journal of Environmental Education, Vol. 39(1):  19-43. http://eab.sagepub.com/

Employment Preferences and Salary Expectations of Students in Science and Engineering

What kinds of work places are current life sciences students willing to work in? What kinds of salaries do they expect to earn upon graduation? How well do the salary expectations of life sciences students match the reality of the job market? Do white and minority life sciences students have similar work preferences and salary expectations? This article will examine these issues by analyzing data from a national study of college students in life science fields conducted by the author. The paper finds that students express a willingness to work in a variety of institutional settings upon graduation and that their salary expectations are comparable to what employers are paying new graduates. However, the study also found racial and gender differences in workplace preferences and salary expectations.

Source: Dorceta E. Taylor. 2007. “Employment Preferences and Salary Expectations of Students in Science and Engineering,” BioScience. 57, 2(February): 175-185. http://www.aibs.org/bioscience/

Environment and the People in American Cities, 1600s-1900s: Disorder, Inequality, and Social Change

Press Release

Professor Taylor explores history of environmental justice in American cities in new book

ANN ARBOR, MI, November 6, 2009This book is published by Duke University Press

A new book from a University of Michigan professor explores how the centuries-old connections between racism and the environment in American cities.

"The Environment and the People in American Cities, 1600s-1900s: Disorder, Inequality, and Social Change" was written by Dorceta Taylor, a professor at the School of Natural Resources and Environment and director of an institute studying the issue of environmental justice its modern context. Duke University Press plans to release the book this month.

The first of two extensive books on conservation history and environmental justice, "The Environment and the People in American Cities" provides a sweeping and detailed examination of the evolution of American cities from Colonial New York and Boston to recent urban planning and labor reform efforts, outlining the rise of problems like overcrowding, pollution, poverty and epidemics and connecting them to systemic environmental racism and other forms of environmental inequities.

"The book takes on this very daunting and long timeline because it is important in getting readers to understand how the cities evolved and how the environmental needs of the cities changed over time," Professor Taylor said.

©2014 MELDI, University of Michigan, All rights reserved